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Sprout

Kevan Garecki
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Sprout

Postby Kevan Garecki on Sun Feb 01, 2015 2:13 am

Sprout was the eldest of a group of stallions seized from a small rural community about 5 hours north of my home near Abbotsford, BC. As we would come to discover, his apparently calm demeanour belied his inner strength, and working with him provided a kaleidoscope of experiences, many of which helped to expand my regard for the interminable equine spirit.
Being the eldest stallion in a natural setting usually carries with it a hefty responsibility, as they typically assume accountability for their herd. Sprout assumed this role with his trademark stoic approach, choosing to lead by quiet example as opposed to brute force. Fear born of mistreatment led Sprout to hoist a shield of bravado, which he displayed as aggression towards anyone who got closer than he was comfortable with. A few moments of watching his body language revealed a horse who in fact did not wish to take the lead, but preferred to simply be at peace. His stoicism also concealed an insidious invader, one that would begin to chisel away at his armour from the inside …
Shortly after Sprout was adopted his new owner discovered discreet anomalies in his behaviour, hinting at some systemic support issues with his feet. But Sprout was far from being willing to stand quietly for a medical examination, so much work would have to be done in order to ensure his calm cooperation. As his emotional rehabilitation progressed, the somatic limitations flared up to the point where he simply could not participate in any more physical exercise. Sprout quietly accepted his lot, and in a not altogether unsurprising development decided to turn to his new human partner for support.
As time progressed his condition worsened to the point every responsible horseperson dreads; to relieve his suffering once and for all. I was invited down to photograph Sprout in his final days; this image was taken as he was being led away from a group of mares who had been inadvertently let out into a neighbouring field. The remarkable woman who tasked herself with his recovery, and ultimately had to make the toughest choice when there was simply no way to keep him out of pain, led Sprout away not with the usual trappings associated with handling a stallion… she simply reached under his neck & grasped a lock of his mane in her fingers, whispered softly to him and the two took their last walk together …
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"We are responsible forever for that which we tame."
- Antoine de Saint-Exupery

Kevan Garecki
Registered Guest
 
Posts: 68
Joined: Wed Jan 12, 2005 10:48 am
Location: Langley, BC
Has thanked: 31 times
Have thanks: 26 times

Re: Sprout

Postby Kevan Garecki on Sun Feb 01, 2015 2:14 am

Sprout, his final walk
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"We are responsible forever for that which we tame."
- Antoine de Saint-Exupery


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